THEY’VE LANDED

We had some more extraterrestrial visitors on Wednesday. They were checking up on the preparations for the UFO Festival on September 4th. Keep an eye out for more other worldly visitors around town and post your pictures in the comments below, email them to us PBL@rcls.org, or just PM them to us here.

Don’t forget to stop by the library on your way to the UFO Festival to check out our Yard Sale open from 9-3.

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GET OUT AND VOTE!!!

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STAR GAZING RETURNS

The Pine Bush Area Public Library presents: Stargazing The 2021Autumn Skies

8:00 PM, September 21st, 2021 (Rain date September 28th)

Galeville Park on Long Lane Town of Shawangunk, Wallkill. See the stars and constellations and maybe even a shooting star or satellite! Raj Pandya, Director, John R. Kirk Planetarium, Lecturer, Department of Physics and Astronomy SUNY New Paltz, will be our guide to the Stars!

Reservations MUST be made to attend this free event.

Please call (845) 744-4265 ext. 2 to reserve your spots!

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OUT LATEST YOUTUBE VIDEO

The Pine Bush Library would like to thank Trooper Bizjak and his K9 partner Versa for the amazing demonstration they put on for us Monday. We would also thank you, our patrons, for coming out and making this one of the most attended events in years.

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LEND A HELPING HAND TO THOSE IN NEED

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AUGUST NEWS LETTER

Our August news letter has been sent out. If you didn’t receive it and would like to we need your email address. You can email it to us at PBL@rcls.org, send us a privet message on Facebook or give us a call 845-744-4265 ext. 2.For anyone who wants a paper copy they will be available in the community center and main library.

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ALIENS ARE RETURNING TO PINE BUSH

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JOIN US!!!!!

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K9 Cop

The Pine Bush Library would like to thank Trooper BBizjak and his K9 partner Versa for the amazing demonstration they put on for us Monday. We would also thank you, our patrons, for coming out and making this one of the most attended events in years. If you want to see the demonstration again or if you were unable to make it in person don’t worry! We will have the full presentation up on our YouTube channel by then end of the week.

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RAVE REVIEWS BY JEAN EUSTANCE

Rave Reviews by Jean E. Eustance                August 2021

Have you and your parents ever gone to an aquarium?  Have you seen fish and other sea creatures swimming around in big tanks? A woman named Jeanne Power invented some of the first big fish tanks, meant for scientific study, and she found out the secrets of a tiny octopus which makes its own shell.

Last month I looked at children’s books about the sea, featuring scientists from the 20th century.  Today I want to look at Secrets of the Sea, which is set in the 19th century. It is The Story of Jeanne Power, Revolutionary Marine Scientist. This picture book is found in the Juvenile Biography section in the Pine Bush Area Public Library.

Jeanne Villepreux-Power was born in France, and worked in Paris, and then got married and moved to Sicily with her husband. She liked the island of Sicily and started to study and draw all the land animals she saw. Then she wondered what the animals in the sea looked like. And more than that, what did the animals do? She worked and worked, and became a scientist when women were not expected to become scientists.

The book says, “Other naturalists studied the preserved bodies of dead sea creatures, but Jeanne wanted to study sea creatures as they lived. She wanted to meet them face-to-face. She wanted to see how they moved through the water, how they interacted with each other, how they grew and changed over time. She put her mind to work. Maybe a tank would do the trick, she thought. A large tank of clear glass, filled with salt water so animals could swim inside. That way, she could study sea creatures in her own home!”

She had to design and make the tank, herself, in 1832. It wasn’t just a fish bowl, it was an aquarium built for scientific study. An aquarium can be the large tank that the fish swim in. An aquarium, nowadays, can be the building that holds the big fish tanks, so people can come in and see them.

 In Sicily, Jeanne Power asked the local fishermen to save sea animals for her, and she put them in her aquariums. Eventually she became fascinated with a small octopus called the paper nautilus. She found eggs and raised them and watched while the little octopi developed their “shells” on their heads. They did not steal their shells from other animals. They grew them, themselves.  And these “shells” were really cases, to hold their eggs.

Jeanne Power had to push to get other scientists to pay attention. She had to repeat her experiments.  She had to tell people that she had invented those aquariums.

“Jeanne joined many scientific academies throughout her life, a rare feat for a woman in the nineteenth century. Her research was published in several languages, and she earned the respect of her peers. This respect wasn’t just for her discovery that the paper nautilus creates its shell. With her aquariums, Jeanne paved the way for the study of living sea creatures. She brought humans and the sea closer together than ever before.”

So, if you go to an aquarium this summer, say “thank you” to Jeanne Power.

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BEAT THE HEAT

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Rave Reviews by Jean E. Eustance July 2021

Do you like to read about the oceans of the world? The Pine Bush Area Public Library has some neat books about oceans, and mapping them. Look for them in the Children’s Department. If you remember The Magic School Bus On the Ocean Floor you might remember the bus driving off the edge of the Continental Shelf, into deeper water. Why do we know that there is a Continental Shelf, and why do we know nowadays that there are mountains and valleys under the waves?  Thank Marie Tharp for mapping the ocean floor.

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea is a picture book about Marie Tharp (1920-2006.) She grew up making maps. She became a scientist when women were not supposed to be scientists.  She looked at the map of the world and wondered what was under the surface of the sea.  Sound waves (sonar) was being used to find out how deep the ocean was, in various spots.  She put together the different soundings, and mapped, first the Atlantic Ocean, and then the rest of the world’s oceans.  She realized that there were mountains and valleys in the depths of the sea.  The sea floor is not all flat.  The sea floor looks a lot like the mountains and valleys on the continents that we live upon.

She even found the rift in the Atlantic, where the continental plates pull apart.  Her work helped to prove the theory of Continental Drift. “One scientist put it very simply. ‘Marie didn’t just make maps. She understood how the Earth works,”

Two other scientists, Otis Barton and Will Beebe, wanted to see the fish and plants that live in the sea.  They wanted to see what life looked like, way down in the depths. Otis and Will Discover the Deep: The Record-Setting Dive of the Bathysphere is a picture book about their work. On the page at the back of the book, it reads they “dove together in the Bathysphere at least nineteen times between May 27, 1930 and September 11, 1934. They were the first humans to see deep-ocean creatures alive.”

They were lucky to come back from these expeditions alive. The book shows their first dive on June 6, 1930, near Bermuda.  “800 feet. Stop…They flipped on the Bathysphere’s searchlight. Their eyes followed the pale yellow beam that scattered…down, down, into the deep.” Their Bathysphere started other people on the road to making deep-sea submersibles so we can see the things that live way down, down into the deep. 

Find these books at the Pine Bush Area Public Library, and go for a dive!

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NATURE BINGO!!!!!!!

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CHECK OUT OUR LATEST YOUTUBE VIDEO!!!!!

A discussion regarding how to protect yourself and loved ones, pets included, from harmful ticks and mosquitos.

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NATIONAL POLLINATORS MONTH

National Pollinators Month in June encourages the planting of pollinator gardens of native, non-invasive pollen and nectar-producing plants. When these gardens bloom, they attract bees, birds, bats, and other natural pollinators.

Each of these creatures makes the difference between valuable fruits and vegetables on our tables and going without. As we plant and encourage these natural habitats, we’re putting food on the table, too. According to the National Wildlife Federation, pollinators are responsible for 1 of every 3 bites we take. That’s a lot of pollinating! And many wildflowers provide more than just something pretty to look at. Their root systems prevent erosion and many of them provide flavorful and healthful teas and herbal remedies.

While we’re planting native flowers and trees, we’re also providing for our future. Pollinators such as the monarch butterfly and the honey bee have been in decline. While all the reasons have not been identified, increasing the available habitat does help! Encouraging the growth of natural habitats also attract pollinators.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalPollinatorsMonth #BeeCounted

Do you have a spot that could benefit from a pollinator garden? Well, get planting! Find out which are the best plants for your zone. Visit www.nwf.org to find out more. Honey, you won’t regret it. Try these tips to get started on the right path to a pollinator garden:

  • Choose bright flowers – The colors and scent attract pollinators to your garden.
  • Plant for every season – While this means primarily to choose a variety of plants so you’re attracting pollinators all year long, it also has another purpose. In the winter, these plants may be dormant, but they will provide a variety of seeds for pollinators to eat, bringing them back year after year.
  • Welcome insects – Most of them are pollinators, too. Good bugs have the benefit of helping to keep pests at bay.
  • Invite birds to your garden – Add birdhouses, provide seed or flowers they enjoy, supply a water source.

Who are pollinators?

Birds, bats, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, wasps, small mammals, and most importantly, bees are pollinators!

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Due to cloud cover and potential rain tonight’s stargazing event has been rescheduled for tomorrow at 9 pm. If you had signed up you should have received a call from us letting you know. If you are still interested but haven’t signed up call 845-744-4265 ex.2 to do so.

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